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MkMMHBnat SH 



UHMnMHiHinaMfHWIiaMUMM^^ 



THE 



VIRaiiTT A 



SPELLER AND READER 




Youth set ari ,iu at tirst, with ease go on, 

And each new task is witli new pleasur* d^ne. 



lUOHMONP: 

J. li. Keiningham, 211 Broad St. 








BOOK 






T 1:1 1: 



viRaiisriA^ 



SPELLER AND READER 







" Youth set aright at first, with ease go on, 
And each r*e%v task is with nev/ pleasura done." 



EICHMOND: 
J. R. KSXNINGHAM, 211 BuOiJD Bt 

1865, 



145 
l/fe 



MACFARLANE & FERGUSSON, PRINTEMS. 



THE 

VIRGINIA SPELLER Al READER. 

ROMAN CAPITAL LETTERS, 

A B C D E 
F G H I J 
K L M N 
P Q R S T 
U V-W X 
Y Z 



Digitized by tine Internet Arciiive 

in 2010 witii funding from 

Lyrasis IVIembers and Sloan Foundation 



http://www.archive.org/details/virginiaspellerrOOunse 



SPELLKii AND KEADiiK. i 

ITALIC CAPITAL LETTERS. 

A B C D E F G 

H I J K L M 

NO P q R 

8 T U V W 

X Y Z & 

ITALIC SMALL LETTERS. 

a h a d ^ f 9 ^' 

i j h I m n o 

p q r s t u 



ROMAN VOWELS. 

A E I O U Y— a e i o u y 



CONSONANTS. 

1> c d f g li ] k 1 in 11 p 
q r s t V w X z 



DOUBLE LETTERS 
li 11 if ffi ffl 



8 



SPELLBR AND KJBJADEK. 



ba he hi 

ea ce ci 

da de di 

fa fe li 

ga ge gi 

lia he hi 



bo bii 

CO cu 

do du 

fo fu 

go gu 

ho hn 



ja je ji JO ju 

ka ke ki ko ku 

la h li lo lu 

ma me mi mo mu 

na ne ni no nu 

pa pe pi po pu 



ra 


re 


ri 


TO 


ru 


ab 


eb 


ib 


ob 


ub 


m 


s^ 


si 


BO 


su 


ac 


ec 


ic 


oe 


uo 


ta 


te 


tl 


to 


tu 


ad 


ed 


id 


od 


ud 


va 


Y6 


vi 


VO 


vu 


af 


ef 


if 


of 


uf 


wa 


^'6 


Wl 


WO 


wu 


ag 


eg 


% 


og 


ug 


ya 


ye 


yi 


JO 


yu 


ak 


ek 


ik 


ok 


uk 


E.a 


ze 


zi 


20 


Ztl 


al 


el 


11 


ol 


lil 



am em im om 1:5m 

an en ii) or. vm 

ap ep ip op up 

ar er ir or ur 

as es is os us 

at et it ot ut 



av 
ax 

by 
ay 



ex 

cv 



IV ov* 

ix o-x 
dj fy 



ux 



jy kj ]j mj 

py 17 sj tj 

WY zy ia az 



SPELLEB AKD EEADEK. 



ab 
ac 
ad 
af 

ag 

ak 

al 

am 

an 

ap 



ce 
my 
at 
is 



eb 

ec 
ed 
ef 
eg 

ek 

el 
em 

en 
ep 



ci 

me 

if 

to 



ib 
ic 
id 
if 



ik 
ii 

im 

in 

ip 



ob 
oc 
od 
of 



ok 
• ol 
om 
on 

CD 



he 
so 

ox 



up 

an 



ub 
lie 
nd 
nf 

uk 
ul 
um 
nn 

up 



ar 


er 


ir 


or 


nr 


as 


es 


is 


03 


us 


at 


et 


it 


ot 


ut 


av 


ev 


iv 


ov 


uv 


ax 


ex 


ix 


ox 


ux 



gl 

go 

cy 



10 



SPELLEK AND KEADEK. 



book 



cow 




trvmk 4^ 



ship 



stove 



ibk ble bli bio blu 

bra bie bri bro bru 

cla cle cli clo clu 

era ere cri cro cru 

dra dre dri dro dm 

fla lie fii flo flu 

fra fre fii fro fru 

^la gle gli glo glu 

gra gre gri gro gn\ 

pla pie pli pio plu 

pra ])re pri pi'o pni 

sba she sbi slio sbu 




ska ske ski sko ska 

sla sle sli slo slu 

sma sme smi smo smu 

sua sne sni sno snu 

spa spe spi spo spu 

sta ste sti sto stu 

tha the thi the thu 

ti^a ire tri tro tru 



SPELLEK A^^D KEADIlK. 11 



hot 


lot 


not 


cat 


fat 


hat 


dig 


% 
had 


gig 


bid 


did • 
hog 


hid 


bad 


lad 


fop 


lop 


bed 


fed 

fob 


led 


dip 


hip 
nap 


lip 


bob 


mob 


map 


rap 


hut 


cut 
pin 


gut 


cry 


dry 

far 


fry 


iin 


sin 


Ijaj- 


jar 


ben 


ded 
nun 


fen 


bag 


eag- 
let 


hag 


gun 


rim 


bet 


met 


gum 


hum 


mum 


bug 


dug 


hug 


God 


man 


gem 


wed 


piy 


^py 


nut 


.Pg 


nip 


rat 


kid 


mod 


pen 


rag 


dun 


sad 


tin 


log 


rip 


pot 
red 


sob 


put 


mad 
pig 


tar 


wig 


men 


net 


win 


siHm 


tap 


rob 


mar 


set 


fun 



12 



SPELLEK AND READEK. 



Fg 



horse 



chair 



men 



arm 



job 
fix 
wax 
ink 



mud 
old 
her 
tug 



top 

bit 


rob 
rib 


mat 


rub 


tub 


put 


con 


act 


sly 
him 


aU 


odd 


arm 



sut 
rat 
get 
for 



hit 


sty- 


vex 


cup 


din 


ask 


dab 


bud 


six 


dim 


pan 


ark 


sex 


bat 


hem 


beg 


nod 


web 


pen 


bib 


rib 


m 


and 


cub 



fib 

cud 
]iab 
asp 

elm 
wet 
ram 
nit 



SPELLER AM1> READER. 



13 



ipl 


how 


mow 


now 


sow 


bay 


day 


g^J 


hay 


jay 


law 


maw 


paw 


raw 


saw 


tow 


bow 
few 


low 


mow 

mew 


row 


dew 


hew 


new 


nay 


pay 


ray 


say 


way 


doe 


foe 


roe 


toe 


due 


rue 


sue 


awe 


daw 


jaw 



GANNON, 




The cannon makes a loud noise. 



Go in. 
Go on. 
Go up. 



A red cap. He can dig. 
A fat pig. I can hop. 

A tin cup. You can run. 



14 



•ii'irXJ.KK AND READKE. 



dock 
cold 
r^ jkick 
'"^ bend 




sofa 



:kmg 
I deck 
[higli 
'luck 



lock 
fold 
lick 
fend 

damp 
fond 
pink 
hint 



ling 
neck 
nigh 
muck 



hS^ 

sick 

lend 



Ijimp 
pond 
sink 
lint 



smg 
peck 

sigh 
tuck 



teeth 



pump 
^^, |balm 




lump 
calm 
fill 
cuff 

jolt 

fall 

malt 

fell 

dent 



pump 
palm 
hill 
huff 

polt 
gall 
salt 
sell 
lent 



SPELLER AN I' RKA1)KR< 



15 



¥^^ 


coy 


m 


toy 


coo 


too 


woo 


bee 


fee 


see 


die 


^e 


lie 


pea 


sea 


tea 


yea 
orb 


vow 


lay 

oat 


may 


oak 


oar 


ace 


age 


ape 


ear 


eat 


ioe 


one 


our 


out 


own 


use 


are 


aid 


aim 


you 


two 




All of us, my son, are to die. 
If we do no ill, we go to joy. 
Go not in the way of bad men. 
The eve of God is on us all the day- 



16 



SPELLEK AI^I) RKADEH. 



piano 



table 



saddle 



pitclier 



compass 



I buck 
I ramp 
dung 
lield 




9 



^ 



milk 

well 

felt 

wilt 

bark 



muck 
band 
pomp 
puff 



kind 

half 

mend 

hard 

will 



gilt: 

cant 

kill 

talk 



comb 


told 


bulk 


hall 


limb 


jilt 


dumb 


hemp 


land 


gang 


wink 


rent 


duck 


till 


alms 


dull 


pelt 
hull 


bang 


fact 


belt 


sand 


wing 


rich 


back 


half 


silk 


tall 


vamp 


pill 


sift 


lack 


wild 


teU 


plant 


monk 



rant 

pick 

sick 

farm 

left 



SPELLER AND EEADEK. 



11 



lord^ 


wall 


sack 


hora 


rash 


walk 


hunt 


gift 


moss 


dash 


suck 


send 


mark 


dark 


rest 


iiim 


loft 
hilt 


song 


dost 
burn 


lest 


rock 


bank 


port 


melt 


help 


long 


pith 


hiss 


^ent 


mild 


curd 


dish 


lass 


dark 


verb 
tend 


harm 


yarn 

• 
hurt 


dust 


turk 


jack 


mist 


park 


cord 


lurk 


moth 


dart 


tent 


pump 


tack 


vast 


toss 


fork 


card 
rank 


soft 


miss 
cash 


tui-n 


lamb 


herd 


morn 


hulk 


curl 


gird 


lust 


hash 


mint 


gulp 


I'unt 


rush 


vest 


purl 


term 


yard 


west 


feh 


bird 


wolf 


bung 


barn 


tush 


find 


hang 


vent 


path 


test 



18 



SPELLER AND EEADEK. 



turf 


girl 


lark 


corQ 


part 


Land 


went 


garb 


mask 


lest 


rift 


curb 


belt 


last 


hasp 


flax 


plan 
yoke 


shod 


wrai)g 
mind 


shad 


babe 


gale 


cope 


pair 


bate 


drive 


rage 


jade 


lime 


bold 


plate 


hire 


pave 


safe 


ship 


cane 


mute 


base 



CANAL BOAT. 




The boat is drawn by horses. 



If we live well, we shall die well. 
He doth live ill who doth not mend. 
We must love all men : yea, we must pray for 
them thai bato Vih, and tiy to do us harm. 



SPELLEK A>D EEABEn, 



19 



cage 


wide 


lane 


cure 


lite 


cave 


note 


rove 


wile 


vice 


bane 


game 


cake 


core 


dine 


mole 


lace 
safe 


mile 


kite 
wipe 


take 


rule 


bare 


buge 


bake 


mate 


pore 


fate 


wave 


pipe 


lame 


rude 


mule 


bone 


tire 


rise 
vote 


care 


mope 
mace 


pike 


tune 


bere 


lute 


liope 


dame 


lice 


rake 


bive 


wine 


tile 


same 


bite 


wore 


wife 


nice 


robe 


sake 


rule 


bone 


time 


dire 


tide 


fame 


rope 


tore 


ware 


poke 


fade 


face 


life 


make 


page 


mane 


male 


sure 


gate 


dare 


file 


hide 


mice 


like 


pine 


mire 


dice 


pale 


vine 


bope 


fail- 


more 


rate 


pane 


race 


rice 



20 



SPIOLLEK AJSD READER. 



moon 
feel 




far daub 

beam deal 
fray 
gain 
moat 
snow 
foam 



feet 

keen 

gain 

thee 

seen 

meet 

soon 

llOOi 



loud 

roar 
town 
coal 
tear 
they 
Loot 



tool 

soul 

wait 

keep 

leek 

deep 

noon 

doom 



Boys love play ; they run, hop, skip and 
jump. 

They may play some ; but if they would 

be ^^'ise, tb^v should read and work Ichq. 



SPELLER ANiJ liEADER, 



91 



meek 


hoop 


deer 


reel 


seem 


fool 


coop 


seek 


weep 


heel 


jail 


laid 


coin 


pour 


gout 


seal 


clay 


flow 


howl 


meaa 


thaw 


void 


nail 


rout 


bowl 




Of all animals the dog is the most inter- 
esting. Forsaking all others, he attaches 
himself to his master, and seems nev^er so 
happy as when taking a ramble in the 
woods or fields with one he loves. 



i)v) 



SPELLER ±jSD HEADEE. 



boat 
flea 




true 

gilt 
fain 
crow 
stay 
soul 
down 



maim 

slow 

beak 

read 

fowl 

coat 

gown 

cine 



Tliey who would read well, must at first 
learn to read slow, and mind all the stops ; 
at each of which they must make a short 
pause. 



SPELLER AND REaD^.. 



dray 


hair 


rail 


main 


spew 


deaf 


load 


meat 


weak 


grow 


1 


^ 


horse 


! world 


• froth 


i 


^^^ 


trust 


clSh 


crush 


^^H 


^^L 


launc 


•h blind 


shred 


Jff^^ 


ri^^X 


fetch 


shark 
lungs 


craft 


patch 


scrub 


ketch 


scorn 


blunt 




wrist 


bench 


cloth 


throb 




f.ash 


match 


speck 


brisk 




march 


smart 


latch 


bliss 




frank 


crust 


broth 


chest 




birch 


crosa 


twist 


plait 




scoff 


sprat 


thick 


small 




dross 


forth 


grasp 


brush 




trust 


tench 


blend 


chaff 




block 


sprig 


track 


strap 




chum 


storm 


crock 


glass 




truth 


marsh. 



i>4 



SPELLEIl AND EEABER. 



pride 


choke 


glare 


blame 


stave 


prose 


herse 


swine 


sharp 


those 


hedge 


prone 


barge 


'^'aste 


shave 


theme 


bride 


helve 


spark 


torch 


spirit 


bluff 


chose 


snore 


smile 


which 


smack 


graze 


there 


snack 


brunt 


stilt 


sword 


knack 


spent 


glove 


purge 


worth 


gloss 


start 




The first laws or rules which we are re- 
quired to observe are those given by pa- 
rents ; and we ought to obey them because 
our parents are wiser than we, and know 
best what is good for us. 





SrhLLEP. 


ANP KEADEP.. 25 


house 


bound 


crowd 


haunt 


round 


louse 


proud 


pouch 


count 


mouth 


vaunt 


sound 


stout 


pound 
steed 


scout 


cause 


creep 


bleed 


cheer 




leech 


sweet 


teeth 




@ ileet 


sweep 


check 


J^ 


g^ breed 


speed 
proof 

spoon 


wheel 




^^ sheer 


shoot 


tooth 


iioor 


bloom 


stool 


loose 


scoop 


sloop 


groom 


broad 


sloop 


gloom 


brook 


stoop 


goose 


^i 


shook 


broom 


stood 


queen 


sleep 


kneel ^ 


^^& 


steel 
sleek 


steer 
teach 


booth ^ 
sheaf ^ 


reach • 


sneak 


clean ^-*^ 


^^^k». 


mouse 


speak 


cheap 


yM^"^ 


tease 


heart 


cream 


I 



26 SPELLER Al^iD REaBER: 

noise strain trail lease 

saint claim toncli shear 

raise frail taint poise 

peace leave point slain 

cloud mourn faint bleat 

groan reach feast cheat 

quick joint rnoist broil 

faith treat coach heave 





r I 

I 



A\.'f,^ 



See ! here is a fine ship. All her sails are 
Bet, and she cuts the water as she sails along. 
It will take her a longtime to get to a port. 
The sea will sometimes be stormy. 



SPELLEB AND P.EADEE. 



"Ji 



throne 
chance 
branch 
scotch 



prance 

thrice 

charge 

cheese 



stripe 
stride 
thresh 
thrive 



stroke 
strive 
flitch 
bought 



prince 
harsh 
snatch 
trance 



fringe 
pledge 
thrush 
plough 



bridge 
crutch 
drench 
scheme 

strike 
starve 
speech 

sleeve 




The Giraffe has 
a very extraordi-^ 
nary appearance, 
from his being so 
low behind ; he 
moves very awk- 
w a r d 1 y , drag- 
ging, as it were, 
his hind legs a& 
ter him. 



28 



SPELLER AND LE^iDEE, 



Words accented on the first syllable. 




vi-per 



ro-sy 

ru-by 

ru-ia 

su-et 

ti-cly 

ra-ker 

na-ked 

af-ter 

ri-der 

er-ror 

or-der 

an-gel 

so-Ler 

fe-ver 

pa-gan 

ca-per 

tu-tor 

ha-zel 

pi-per 



SPELLER AND KEADEti. 



gru el 


mer cy 


smo ky 


han dy 


mer ry 


sor row 


hap py 


mot to 


spi cy 


har dy 


mud dy 


sto ry 


liob by 


par ty 


sul ly 


jocky 


pen ny 


sur ly 


jolly 


puppy 


tab by 


lob by 


que ry 


tally 


lof ty 


qui et . 


tar dy 


luc ky 


sil ly 


tri al 


fag got 


mor tai 


sin fui 


gal lop 


mur der 


sor rel 


gar ter 


num ber 


tan ner 


gun ner 


nut meg- 


ten der 


liam let 


pan nel 


tra der 


har lot 


pep per 


vel vet 


Mu der 


pban torn 


ves sel 


ken nel 


pot ter 


vul gar 


kd der 


ren der 


wan der 


Ian cet 


rob ber 


wil ful • 


Mm ber 


run ner 


win ter 



30 



SPELLEE AND READER. 








See tlie fox. 

He has a den. 

He dug it in tlie ground. 

It keeps him warm and safe. 



See him go out of his den. 
He sees the warm sun. 
M He feels the pure air. 
He hears the birds sing. 

He is glad. 
He runs and jumps. 
Hark, he hears a noise. 
See him look round. 

He sees a dog. 
The dog barks at him. 
The dog runs at him. 
^e wants to kill the fox. 
Can he catcli the fox 'I 
The fox runs fast. 
Now he has got home. 
He is safe in his den, 



SPELIEIi Al^D KEADEE. 



31 



trum pet 
si lent 
mit tens 
splen dour 
ton nage 
sill try 
pre cept 
sliel tev 
mam mon 



chest nut 
sot tisli 
pat tern 
spin ster 
mem ber 
sp'in ter 
til lage 
sul len 
par eel 



ut ter 
spun gy 
frow ard 
stag ger 
ran dom 
sim per 
tap ster 
stam mer 
mo ment 





-^^=^^3£^^#^^^ 



Tea is the leaves of a plant that grows 
iu China, 



32 SPELLER AND READER. 

chil clren sum rner bar rei 

HI let ~ lord ship fod der 

pli ant ser pent cost ly 

sera per mo disL. bunt er 

tet ter war like slug gard 

li ning turn er trot ter 

sharp er sha dy war rant 

mil ler plum met plat ter 

sig nal lit ter su et 

con trite sum mon pur chase 



sup per tin der skil fill 

pil fer spite ful per son 

tor ment pa rent rec tor 

sun der splen did sur name 

rub bish pur blind trans port 

ser vant self ish rug ged 

bant ling tumb ler sur face 

fro zen spin net ten dril 

e vil pip kin snap pish 

con vent spin ner pur pose 

bhar pen med loy lln net 



SPELLER AND RBADEB. 

sMl ling suf fer -e ven 



thank M 


wil ling 


fet ter 


pam per 


short ly 


gib bet 


sexton 


stern ly 


tru ant 


pave ment 


tar nisk 


np shot 


con tract 


stin gy 


vie tim 


•safe ty 


nine ty 


sen tence 


art less 


par don 


r^n som 


slum ber 


rant er 


sin ner 



PRIlSTTINa PRESS. 




Snow and hail are drops of rain, frozen 

by the coldness of the air. 
S 



u 



SPELLER AWD READER. 



shep herd 


san dy 


cor ner 


waste fal 


tat ter 


fla grant 


mur mur 


slut tish 


hang er 


stu dent 


plat form 


dres ser 


pil grim ; 


slen der 


si an der 


subject 


rum mage 


thread bare 


there fore 


slug gish 


pos set 


shame ful 


tenth ly 


gold finch 


ren net 


plu mage 


fid dler 


sal ad 


shut ter 


cul ture 


but ter 


tur nip 


morn ing 


whis per 


wor ship 


part ner 


ad vent 


sloth fill 


si lence 


cut ler 


pru dent 


rem nant 


fret ful 


lim ner 


time ly 


grit ty 


six fold 


lone some 


human 


glos sy 


fer ret 


Ian tern 


con vert 


skip per 


satch el 


buffet 


Qon quest 


pars nip 


back ward 


brim stone 



SPELLEE AND EEADEE. 35 



THE BALL. 

The boys play ball. 
They love to play. 
John lost his ball. 
His bat went next. 

John is now sad. 
How can he play ? 
James has a ball. 
Take a new game. 

Cry not for this. 
You may find the ball. 
Yon must look for it. 
Be not so sad. 

It was a fine day. 
Ann went to walk. 
She lost her doll. 
She too is sad* 

What does she find ? 
A bat and a ball. 
John found a doll. 
Both are now glad. 



36 



SPELLER AND READEE. 



pic ture 


com fort 


cab bage 


stop ]3age 


gun shot 


flu ent 


fore taste 


fru gal 


gut ter 


hard ship 


in ward 


crafty 


dul lard 


stop per 


scaf fold 


com ment 


va grant 


gar ret 


fop pisli 


wed ding 


horse man 


glim mer 


stran ger 


in sect 


in most 


gus set 


fur long 




The cock crows ; the 
goose hisses ; the turkey 
gobbles ; the dog barks ; 
the cat purrs and mews ; 
the cricket chirps ; the 
dove coos ; the peacock 
screams ; the swallow 

twitters ; the owl hoots ; the lamb bleats ; 

the hog squeals ; the cow lows ; tl.e horse 

neighs ; the bull bellows. 



SPELLER AND EEADKE. 



3-7 



tliun der 


drum mer 


bit ter 


liar vest 


child ish 


cbam ber 


grace ful 


grate ful 


fun nel 


%gy 


land mark 


idol 


let ter 


con verse 


like ly • 


se cret 


scorn ful 


her mit 


pil lar 


per feet 


glit ter 


sat in 


max im 


chap man 


liang ings 


Var nish 


lug gage 


cliop per 


turn pike 


tem pest 


par lour 


blun der 


pen cil 


scan dal 


cburcli man 


scan ty 


turn stile 


flan nel 


war fare 


scab bard 


help ful 


ven ture 


pan try 


le gal 


ut most 


chast en 


in fant 


strange ly 


drug get 


sear let 


con duct 


com mon 


vir gin 


fen nel 


liost ler 


tun nel 


vin tage 


land scape 


up side 


tat ter 



38 



SPELLER AND READER. 



gos pel 


spi got 


four score 


hav oc 


tal on 


gov ern 


jour nal 


vis age 


lias sock 


knowl edge 


wheel er 


juice less 


leath er 


am pie 


knuc kle 


ma gic 


bare foot 


li quor 


noi sy 


cheap ness 


mel on 


pas time 


doc tress 


naugli ty 


rat tie 


eye brow 


pad lock 



EAGLE. 




The Eagle is a very large bird, and is to 
be found in this country. There are seve- 
ral kinds of this bird. 



.SPELLER AND READER. 



B^ 



ap pie 


mas ter 


an swer 


brew er 


name less 


braw ny 


care ful 


oat meal 


cap tain. 


dear ly 


pea cock 


dead ly 


ea gle 


quick ly 


ear wig 


fair ly 


read er 


faitliful 


giv er 


sa,m pie 


gain say 


liear ty 


tai lor 


health ful 


in sight 


vir tue 


im age 


jaun dice 


up right 


jew el 


mis tress 


crick et 


ram ble 


nas ty 


dir ty 


sal mon 


quick en.' # 


€T er 


tal ent 


pastry 


fid die 


Yal ue 


riv er ^^.^.^ 
sau cy^^?^.# 


gatli er 


weai ry 


hab it 


jzeal ous 


table 


joy ful 


al way 


vis it 


kna vish 


bish op 


wid ow 


In ere 


chap el 


2;eal ot 


man gle 


dai ly 



40 



3FELLEB AND EEADEK. 



buc He 


Ibirsli el 


buck ram 


€olic 


cMId hood 


erns ty 


deaf eB 


doubt fill 


dis tant 


fath om 


faul ty 


frail ty 


grea sy 


great ness 


gram ble 


horn age 


lins ky 


host ess 


mod est 


mon strous 


mus ty 


plan et 


pos ture 


plan tain 


ruffle 


riv er 


rel ish 


J 


PIANO. 


^ 


£^S 


^iiniimi!H^^»KAt<Ji!««»^^«fc<[)|i]|]jlJ|liii»s^^ 





He that will love life, and see good days, 
let him refrain his tongue from evil, and his 
lips that they speak no guile. 



SPELLER AND EEADER. 41 




The heat of summer ripens the produce 
of the farmer's labours, and invites him 
with the sickle, scythe, or cradle in hand, 
to cut down the wheat, the rye, the barley, 
the oats, and the grass ; while the little 
boys are busy in flying the kite, bathing in 
the water, &c. 



The chilling breezes, falling leaves, and 
branches loaded with ripened fruit, inform 
the labourer that autumn is come. The 
apples must now be gathered ; the corn, 
potatoes, and turnips secured for use in win- 
ter ; and the little boys amuse themselves 
with tops, marbles, &c. 



m 



SPELLER AND READER. 



The accent on the first syllable. 



Ab so lute 
lib er ty 
dig ni fy 
op e ra 
glo ri fy 
rec re ate 
jus ti fy 
man ner ly 
cal i CO'' f' 

pe ri od 
fa vour ite 
sac ra meiit 
im pi ous 
vit ri ol 
lat i tude 
ad mi ral 
joi li ty 
dan ger ous 



i.m"v<^ 



kins "WO man 
car pen ter 
nun ne ry 
fol low er 
quan ti ty 
im pu dent 
tem po ral 
bat tie door 
'o pi um 



ev e ry 
rasp ber ry 
liar mo ny 
un der hand 
kna ve ry 
cin na mon 
in di go 
can die stick 
mack e rel . 



ben e fit 
man i fold 
en e my . 
pas sen ger 
Mtk er to 
sane ti fy 
af ter ward 
nee ta rine 
dif fer ent 

quar ter age 
gen e ral 
tan ta lize 
jew el ler 
ag gra vate 
ag gre gate 
book sel ler 
lav en der 
eat a ble 



SPELLER AND READER. 4H 

THE KITE. 

Hen-ry Stoneliada fine kite. On a clear, 
bright day in tlie fall of the year, when the 
wind blew he went out to fly it. 

His broth-er James wished to go with 
him to help him. But Hen-ry said, " No, I 
can fly it my-self." He tried two or three 
times, but only dragged it on the ground 
and tore it. At last he was forced to ask 
his broth-er James to help him. 

James for-gave his want of kind-ness, and 
gave him all the help he could ; and the 
kite was soon seen fly-ing high in the air, 
far a-bove the tops of the tall trees. 

Now they were both very hap-py, and 
staid and watched the kite until they were 
tired of play. Then they went home and 
thanked God ' that he had taken care of 
them, and made them so hap-py. They said 
that they would nev-er quar-rel a-gain, but 
would al-ways share their plays to-geth-er. 



44 



SPELLER AND READEE. 



nour isli ment 
gal le ry 
an i mate 
por rin ger 
dra pe ry 
tel es cope 



fel low ship 
par a ble 
or der ly 
care ful ness 
sep a rate 
iir ma ment 



CROWN 



ob li gate 
bap pi ness 
bla ma ble 
rec to ry 
e ven ing 
vie to ry 




A crown is worn by a king. It is a toy 
for wliicli miicb blood has, at times, been 
shed. 



SPELLER AND READEE. 



45 



an i mal 
o ver board 
di a dem 
scav en ger 
gen tie man 
ut ter ly 
joe u lar 
mar jo ram 
ap pe tite 
op e rate 

des pe rate 
scru pu lous 
gov ern ess 
use ful ness 
ju ni per 
sub sti tute 
ar ti choke 
li a ble 
des ti tute 
fin isli er 



nor tlier ly 
can di date 
read i ly 
fac to ry 
van i ty 
in dus try 
sin gu lar 
mal a dy 
neg a tive 
can is ter 



re com pense 
fur tlier more 
ven i son 
in fa my 
mar tyr dom 
mit ti mus 
in fan cy 
cliar ac ter 
nig gard ly 
pas tur age 



bit ter ness 
pen du lum 
ex eel lent 
teach a ble 
liaz ard ous 
wea ri some 
le gi ble 
gra na ry 
beg gar ly 
part ner ship 

ep i taph 
ter ri ble 
hand ker chief 
wag on er 
leth ar gy 
grand fa ther 
but ter y 
mar vel lous 
em i nence 
gal Ian try 



46 



SPELLER AND READEK. 



reg u Jar 
mul ber ry 
or gan ist 
bar net 
sin ew y 
en mi ty 
cer ti fy 
hyp o crite 



iieav i ness 
nies sen ger 
ab sti nence 
rej) ro bate 
drunk en ness 
ve he mence 
gree di ly 
gro ce ly 



sec ond ly 
of fer ing 
pil lo ry 
cer tain ly 
treach e ry 
fath er less 
friv o Ions 
in ju ry 






IliiiSiil 

"■ ■:* 1^ W ' 





He that is slow to anger, is better than 
the mighty; and he that mleth his spirit, 
than he that taketh a city. 



SPELLEK AND READER. 



4t 



gov era or 
pes ti lence 
lib e ral 
ter ri fy 
a the ist 
pet ti coat 
drop si cal 
tes ti fy 
glo ri oas 
com e dy 

lu mi nous 
his to ry 
an nu al 
like li hood 
dil i gent 
ob sti nate 
grad u al 
set tie ment 
but ter fly 
8ol emn ly 
e qual ize 



wick ed ness 
in ^ del 
sep ul chre 
nu me ral 
or i gin 
car ri er 
scar ci ty 
faith ful ly 
won der ful 
in no cence 



griev ous ly 
nine ti eth 
in flu ence 
cir cu lar 
flight in gale 
fam i ly 
rem e dy 
ar ti fice 
res i due 
drow si ness 
v er bal ly 



heart i ly 
res o lute 
med i cine 
em bas sy 
bev e rage 
reg u lar 
em pe ror 
rig i lant 
hea yen ly 
fu ri ous 

majesty 
se ri ous 
bu si ly 
med i tate 
el o quent 
pat ri arch 
hos pi tal 
pov er ty 
charge a ble 
tract a ble 
fish 6 ry 



48 SPELLER AND READER. 



THE STAK. 

Twinkle, twinkle, little star, 
How I wonder wiat you are ! 
Up above the world so high, 
Like a diamond in the sky. 

When the blazing sun is gone, 
When he nothing shines upon. 
Then you show your little light, 
Twinkle, twinkle, all the night. 

Then the traveller in the dark. 
Thanks you for your tiny spark ! 
He could not see which way to go. 
If you did not twinkle so. 

In the dark blue sky you keep, 
And often through my curtains peep, 
For you never shut your eye 
Till the sun is in the sky. 

As your bright and tiny spark 
Lights the traveller in the dark, 
Though I know not what you are, 
Twinkle, tAvinkle, little star. 



SPELLER AND READEE. 49 

wil der ness gov em ance com ic al 

her aid ry fish, er man i ron y 

grid i ron live li hood house hold er 

in fer ence rose ma ry for es ter 

sev en ty rid i cnle trum pet er 

trag e dy per qui site vig o rous 

mis sle toe in so lent for eign er 

grace ful ly hus band man for ci ble 

ius ti ly cheer ful ly con ju rer 

THE URN. 




Learn something: usefal every day, 
4 



50 



SPELLER AND READER. 



hur ri cane 
mer ci less 
ruf fi an 
butcli e ry 
mem o ry 
ex er cise 
sol i tude 
her mit age 
cu ri ous 
tyr an ny 

con fi clent 
cov et ous 
in di gence 
lit a ny 
prov i dence 
com pa ny 
in ward ly 
con fi dence 
main te nance 
vi o lence 
straw ber ry 



lu di crous 
pow er fill 
ad jee tive 
lee tu rer 
dif fer ence 
rev er ence 
gun ne ry 
vir tu ous 
skel e ton 
min is try 



fool e Yj 
chas ti ty 
guard i an 
mul ti tude 
grand mo tlier 
du ti ful 
for mal ly 
boun te ous 
ca pa ble 
du ra ble 
re gis ter 



mock e ry 
out er most 
i vo ry 
change a ble 
piety 
flue tu ate 
treas ur er 
cin na mon 
for tu nate 
vin e gar 

in ti mate 
grav i ty 
fre quen cy 
spec ta cle 
com mon er 
in stru ment 
choc o late 
mer ci ful 
for ti tude 
trou ble some 
rus set in 



SPELLER AND READEE. 



51 



The accent on the second 



An otli er 
be got ten 
dis ci pie 
en joy ment 
for give ness 
here af ter 
en clo sure 
more o ver 
oc cur rence 

par ta ker 
re pent ance 
sin cere ly 
to getli er 
vice ge rent 
slip pe ry 
plen ti ful 
mon u ment 
fla ge let 
cu i*a cy 



un civ il 
dis cov er 
in qui ry 
pro due tive 
re ci tal 
se cure ly 
a pos tie 
be liol den 
con sid er 



di rect ly 
en a ble 
for get ful 
lie ro ic 
im mor tal 
plas ter er 
lu na cy 
fan ci ful 
con tra ry 
fruit er er 



syllable. 

ma jes tic 
ob serv er 
pa ter nal 
re ceiv er 
se vere \j 
tri bu nal 
un ac tive 
de ceit ful 
en coun ter 

ig no ble 
pa thet ic 
re cord er 
se duce ment 
un bo som 
mis e ry - 
twen ti etli 
vis it er 
pleu ri sy 
res i dence 



52 



SPELLER AND READER. 



ri ot ous 
pu pil age 
low er most 
gr^te ful ly 
couD sel lor 
liv e Tj 
au di ence 
cus torn er 
for mer ly 
clean li ness 

lit ur gy 
cle men cy 
six ti etli 
circumstance 
stew ard ship 
chan ce ry 
sump tu ous 
dis trac tion 
sub mis sion 
pliy si cian 
con ver sion 



neg li gence 
pew ter er 
rot ten ness 
sla ve ry 
tow ard ly 
mir a cle 
tor ri bly 
thir ti eth 
sor row ful 
trav el ler 



bias plie my 
clieese monger 
con Stan cy 
pun ish ment 
sov er eign 
poul ter er 
ref er ence 
re due tion 
re li gious 
o mis sion 
cor rec tion 



pub li can 
mil li ner 
fright ful ly 
clias tise ment 
pre sent ly 
sil la bub 
con fer ence 
rob be ry 
cbol er ic 
herb al ist 

care less ly 
rhet o ric 
tes ta ment 
bias phe mous 
treas u rer 
con fine ment 
den si ty 
in ven tion 
trans ac tion 
ex tor tion 
di vis ion 



SPELLER AND READER. 



53 



pro por tion 
pe ti tion 
at trac tion 
pos ses sion 
out ra geoiis 
ap pen dix 
in Ilu man 
re ful gent 
dis trib ute 
in jus tice 

dis or der 
pro pliet ic 
a cute ness 
en ven om 
un lio ly 
oc ta vo 
af fee tion 
de clen sion 
ex cep tion 
im pres sion 
ob struc tion 



con fu sion 
con vie tion 
op pres sion 
as cen sion 
am bi tious 
un seem ly 
un luck y 
en trea ty 
re mem ber 
dis tin guisli 



spec ta tor 
en tire ly 
un pleas ant 
im pure ly 
ex .ot ic 
die ta tor 
col lee tion 
de struc tion 
foun da tion 
ma li cious 
ob jec tion 



re flee tion 
re cep tion 
au da cious 
con di tion 
com pas sion 
sur vi ver 
e ra sure 
es tab lisli 
un god ly 
in vec tive 

a pos tate 
arch bisli op 
re fu sal 
un band some 
ad be sive 
ad di tion 
car na tion 
e di tion 
in fee tion 
ma gi cian 
per mis sion 



54 



SPELLER AND HEADER. 



per fee tion 
sub jec tion 
tempt a tion 
con clu sion 
de due tion 
re la tion 
oc ca sion 



re demp tion 
sal YX tion 
vex a tion 
com bus tion 
con vie tion 
in struc tion. 
o pin ion 



re bell ion 
trans gres sion 

af flic tion 

• 

as ser tion 
ex pres sion 
pro fes sion 
per sua sion 




If we would be liappy, we must learn to 



be good. 



SPELLER AND READER. 55 



THE HEN AND FOX. 



Jane Hall had a ^ne black hen, which 
she used to feed with crumbs, un-til she was 
quite tame. 

One day this hen got out of the yard 
with her lit-tle chick-ens, and went in-to a 
grove which was near. 

Jane soon miss-ed her, and ta-king the 
dog, set-off to hunt her, for she was a-fraid 
she might lose her chick-ens. 

When they reached the grove they found 
the hen ma-king a loud noise, and try-ing 
to keep off a young fox cub that want-ed 
to seize her chick-ens. 

The dog soon killed the fox ; and the hen 
was so grate-fiil, that she al-ways went with 
the dog af-ter that, and would some-times 
roost in hisien-nel. 



56 



SPELLER AND REABEl?. 



The accent on the first syllable. 



Ad 



ry 



cer e mo ny 
dif ^ culty 
el e gan cy 
for mi da ble 
gul li flow er 
im po dent ly 
sane tu a ry 
an nu al ly 

per sqii a ble 
vol un ta ry 
prof it a ble 
cow ard li ness 
ig no min y 
lios pit a bly 
a vi a ry 
sep a ra ble 
cop u la tive 
per isL. a ble 



or di na ry 
pas sion ate ly 
rep u ta ble 
sol i ta ry 
ter ri to ry 
val u a ble 
ut ter a ble 
or a to ry 
com mis sa ry 

pen e tra ble 
pros e cu tor 
va ri ous ly 
cred it a ble 
tran si to ry 
a mi a ble 
ob du ra cy 
sea son a ble 
crit i cal ly 
con quer a ble 



SPELLER AND BEADEE. 



51 



pat ri mo nj 
an swer a ble 
cor di al ly 
ser vice a bly 
ad ver sa ry 
ex e era ble 
cus torn a ry 
mat ri mo ny 
ne ces sa ry 
ac ces so ry 

cat er pil lar 
dam age a ble 
ef ^ ca cy 
gen tie wo man 
lion our a ble 
in ti ma cy 
lit e ra ture 
meas ur A^le 
pal at a ble 
sec re ta ry 
vi o la ble 



pnr ga to ry 
el i gi ble 
prom is so ry 
nu me ra ble 
com mon al ty 
mul ti pli er 
dis pu ta ble 
con tro ver sy 
mis e ra ble 
ac cu rate ly 

char it a ble 
ex qiiis ite ly 
bab it a ble 
lu mi na ry 
mem o ra ble 
pen sion a ry 
rea son a ble - 
stat n a ry 
va ri a ble 
ar ro gant ly 
conr te ons ly 



58 



SPELLER AND READER. 



par don a ble 
tern po ra ry 
pref ef a ble 
com men ta ry 
war rant a ble 
ap o plex y 
prac ti ca ble 



com for ta ble 
vir tu al ly 
ad mi I'a ble 
sub lu na ry 
com pe ten cy 
mel an cbol y 
spec u la tive 




Blessed is lie tbat considereth tlie poor ; 
the Lord will deliver him in time of trouble. 



SPELLEK AKD KEADEE. 59 



A PRETTY THING, 

Who am I tliat shine so bright, 
With my pretty yellow light, 
Peeping through your curtains grey ? 
Tell me, little girl, I pr^y. 

When the sun is gone, I rise, 
In the very silent skies ; 
And a cloud or two doth skim 
Round about my silver rim. 

All the little stars do seem 
Hidden by my brighter beam ; 
And^mong them I do ride, 
Like a queen in all her pride. 

Little girl, consiaer well. 
Who this simple tale doth tell ; 
And I think you'U guess it sooUj 
For I only am the Moon. 



60 



SPELLER AND READER. 



The accent on the last syllahle. 



Ap per tain 
tliere a bout 
ev er more 
o ver flow 
in di rect 
dis a gree 
rec on cile 
o ver look 
in ter line 

su per fine 
o ver turn 
mis in form 
un der mine 
dis o blige 
dis al low 
o ver take 
un der stand 
im por tune 
in ter fere 
o ver throw 



sev en teen 
dis o bey 
un be lief 
here up on 
com pre hend 
o ver grown 
in dis creet 
dis re gard 
dis a]3 point 

dis com pose 
in ter cede 
in dis pose 
in cor rect 
in ter mix 
ap pre hend 
o ver run 
dis es teem 
dis pos sess 
in ter cept 
o ver borne 



con tra diet 
vi o lin 
gren a dier 
af ter noon 
mis be have 
here to fore 
car a van 
rep ri mand 
o ver cast> 

yes ter night 
dis ap pear 
con de scend 
rec om mend 
o ver^ome 
vol un teer 
in so much 
rep re hend 
mis ap ply 
su per scribe 
dis be* lief 



SPELLEiR AND HEADER. 61 

The accent on the third syllable, 

Al plia bet i cal hos pi tal i ty 

cer e mo ni al im por tu ni ty 

dis a gree a ble jus ti fi a ble 

ex com mu ni cate mer i to ri ous 

fal 11 bil i ty op por tu ni ty 

ge o graph i cal phi lo sopli i cal 

lib er al i ty per pen die u lar 

in ex pres si ble im ma te ri al 

gen e al o gy in con ceiv a ble 

in sig nif i cant cat e chet i cal 

prob a bil i ty in e qual i ty 

a rith met i cal ge o met ri cal 

rec on il la ble in ci vil i ty 

min is te ri al cliro no lo gi cal 

in fi del i ty im pro pri e ty 
byp crit i cal * rep re sen ta tive 

im mor tal i ty a pos tol i cal 

mat ri mo ni al in sup port a ble 

dis o be di ence man u fac to rv 



62 SPELLER AND REABEE, 

in ge nu i ty gen e ral i ty 

e van gel i cal in ter me di ate 

in con sid er ate mis eel la ne ous 

pop u lar i ty in con so la ble 

im ac conn ta ble con tn me li ous 

sen su al i ty ir re sis ti ble 

ac a dem i cal an ni ver sa ry 

u ni for mi ty cer e mo ni ous 

su j^er nat u ral in ex cu sa ble 

u ni ver si ty in dis pen sa ble 

cu ri OS i ty am bi gu i ty 

cir cu la to ry cus tom a ri ly 

ded i ca to ry ex pi a to ry 

fig u ra tive ly j^ di ca to ry 

or di na ri ly ap pli ca to^y 

sup pli ca to ry pos tu la to ry 

vol un ta ri ly spir it u al ly 

Silk is the produce of* a worm called tlie 
silk-worm : tliey are raised in warm coun- 
tries, and fed on the leaves of the white 
mulberry. 



SPELLER AND READER. 63 

THE STUDIOUS BOY. 

Peter Thinkwell is fond of liis studies. 
He does not mean to be a fool, but intends 
to do some thing in the world. 

A great man says, "I was riding one 
day, and I met, every ^little while, some 
small stream,' and they were all going the 
same way. At last, I asked one where he 
was going. ' Why,' said the little rill, ' I 
am going to the city. I hear they want a 
great canal there, and I am going to help 
make it.' ' Why, what can you do ? I can 
step over you.' ' I don't know,' said the 
little rill, ' but I shall be there.' I came 
to another, and another, and they all said 
the same thing. They did not know what 
they could do, but all meant to do some- 
thing. 

" I went to the city, and I found running 
by its Bide a mighty river. The canal was 



64 



SPELLER AND READER. 



made, and bore on its bosom mighty steam 
sliips and the wealth of nations. It was 
all made by the little streams." 

Thus, each one in this world helps to 
make the grand tide of life, and fills some 
space in the vast stream, as it rushes on to 
the ocean of eternity. 



TOBACCO. 

Tobacco is a 
native of Ame- 
rica; as a medi- 
cine, it is use- 
ful ; b u t t h e 
health of many 
is much impair- 
ed by too free- 
ly making use 
of it, in smoking, chewing, and snuffing ; 
and much time and money are expended 
in this way, that might be better appro- 
priated. 




SPELLER AND EEADER. 



05 



The accent on the second svllaUe, 


A far 


canoe 


bas soon 


di vulge 


har angue 


con dense 


ab stract 


a gliast 


calash 


de pict 


re hearse 


be siege 


as pire 


bur lesque 


e elipse 


ac count 


quad rille 


gro tesque 


pro rogue 


en rich 


ex punge 


bo Ilea 


* ca rouse 


suggest 


e quip 


prefix 


a byss 


ga zette 


u surp 


de duce 


af front 


de serve 


e nough 


bom bast 


' affright 


de sert 


un furl 


dis cern 


ca ress 


dis burse 


a midst 


a bash 


pre diet 


in stead 


be hoove 


ca tarrh 


ex ult 


con dign 


an nounce 


con demn 


forth with 


dis tinct 


a stray 


con. sign 


a brea^ 


ex tinct 


re lapse 



6-6 



SPELLER ANr> KEABEl?. 



The accent on the firat syllable. 

Cit i zen zo di ac 

^yn the sis stig ma tize 

CO gen cy post hu mous 

cli a logue 
va ri ous 
a gen cy 
chron i cle 
beau te ous 
hu mor some 

rlaeu ma tism 
prom i nent 
frol ick some 
Ion gi tude 
di a lect 
clxor is ter 
voc a tive 
cur va tive 
liy a cinth 
mon ar cLy 



di a phragm 
fo li age 
sol e cism 
nu tri tive 
cog ni zance 
psalm o dy 

fu gi tive 
pros o dy 
dis so nant 
pa geant ry 
hoist er ous 
f u mi gate 
\oj a ger 
oys ter man 
an thor ize 
col o quy 



SPELLEK AKD KEADEE. 67 

THE LITTLE LARK. 
I hear a pretty bird, but hark ! 

I cannot see it anywhere, 
Oh ! it is a little lark, 

Singing in the morning air. 
Little lark, do tell me why 
You are singing in the sky ? 

'Tis to watch the silver star, 
Sinking slowly in the skies ; 

And beyond the mountain far, 
See the glorious sun arise, : 

Little lady, this is why 

I am mounted up so high. 

'T is to sing a merry song, 

To the pleasant morning light : 

Why stay in my nest so long, , 
When the sun is shining bright 'i 

Little lady, this is why 

I sing so early in the sky. 

To the little birds below, 

I do sing a merry tune ; 
And I let the ploughman know 

He must come to labour soon. 
Little lady, this is why 
I am singing iu the sky. 



OS 



SPELLER AND REABER. 



The accent 07i the second syllable. 
Noc tur nal em bez zle 



pre sump tive 
re piig nant 
em bra sure 
fan tas tic 
o bei sance 
pie be ian 
sub poe na 
la con ic 

mo lass es 
vo li tion 
dog mat ic 
ap pel lant 
ere den tial 
al lu sion 
pro vin cial 
ex cres cenee 
hys ter ics 
se ques ter 



au tum nal 
e nig ma 
cour age ous 
dis ci pie 
a sy lum 
liy e na 
re pul sive 
a cros tic 

spec ta tor 
sen ten tious 
tran scend ent 
ca tbe dral 
de lin quent 
pro lif ic 
a cliieve ment 
ec cen trie 
atli let ic 
ma gi cian 



SPELLEE AND READER. 



69 



The accent on the third syllable. 



O ver seer 
CO in cide 
dis u nite 
re in force 
in ter leave 
guar an tee 
auc tion eer 
quar an tine 
in com mode 

o ver head 
pic tu resqne 
con tra vene 
cir cum scribe 
in ter sperse 
Bu per scrilje 
pi o neer 
ob li gee 
sub di vide 
dis em bogue 



mag a zme 
dev o tee 
ac qui esce 
con de scend 
dis ha bille 
man u mit 
as cer tain 
su per sede 
pre ma ture 

gaz et teer 
coun ter mand 
pre pos sess 
cir cum volve 
am bus cade 
coun ter vail 
rep re sent 
in ter lard 
en gin eer 
as sign ee 



To SPELLEK AND READER. 

THE JACKKNIFE. 

George, Mother, and Mr. T. 

Q-eorge, mother, I have got a jackknife; 
just such a one as I have wanted this some time. 
[^SJiows the knife to Ms mother. 

Mother, Where did you get it, my son ? 

George, As I was going to school, I saw it 
. lying on the ground before me, and I picked it 
up. Is it not pretty ? 

Mother. Yes ; but are you sure it is yours ? 

G-eorge. There, mother, that is what I thought 
you would say to me. 

Mother. Then you did not feel quite sure ? 

George, No, I did not, for I saw Mr. T^^ 

using one in school yesterday that very much re- 
sembled this ; and, mother, there are the initials 
S. T., on one side of this knife. 

Mother, Those are his initials : why did you 
not go to him and ask him if it was his ? ' 

George, At first I thought I would ; and then 
I thought how much I wanted a knife, and the 
advantages of having one, till it almost seemed 



SPELLEK AND READER. Tl 

right for me to keep it ; but it did not seem quite 
right ; and I was not decided what to do when I 
got to school, and several times this forenoon I 
have thought about the knife ; and the more I 
wanted to keep it, the louder did my conscience 
tell me i! was wrong. 

Mother. I am glad, my son, that you did not 
think it was right to keep it. But I am sorry you 
did not return it this forenoon, as you will not 
have another opportunity till Monday, unless you 
carry it to his house this afternoon. 

Qeorge. I should have returned it, but it was 
so pretty, and it seemed so hard to give it up 
then. But now I have thought more about it, it 
does not seem so hard ; for I can do without a 
knife at present, and perhaps by the time I need 
one, I shall have one. And if you are willing, 1 

should like to go to Mr. T 's house and return 

it ; for I think he may want it. 

Mother. I am not only willing, but glad to 
have you return it. You may go now if you like. 
[Qoes out. 3Ir. T, goes on to the stage. G-eorge 
returns to the stage, and sags to Mr. T ., 

Qeorge. Here is yoyr knife, Mr. T., I found 



12 SPELLER AND EEADEE. 

it in the road when I came to school this morn- 
ing. 

3Ir. T, Thank jou, George ; I am very glad 
to find it. I was afraid it would not be found, and 
I am glad to see you so honest. 

0-eorge, sir, I was not very honest. I did 
want to keep it very much. 

Mr, T. Why did you not then ? 

G-eorge. I thought about it this forenoon, and, 
this noon, and came to the conclusion it was not 
mine, and I had no right to keep it. 

Mr, T. That was the way to do : never make 
a hasty act, for by so doing you may oftentimes 
do wrong. Always stop to think. 

[Mr. T. takes a knife out of his pocket, and says^ 

Here, George, take this knife, which is exactly 
like the one you have so wished to keep ; and 
whenever you use it, may you always remember 
that "honesty is the best policy." 

G-eorge. Thank you, sir. I do not think I 
shall forget it. 

Blr. T. Good by, George. 

G-eorge. Good by, sir. 



SPELLER AND READER. 



73 



Tlie accent on 

A vi a ly 
con scion a ble 
ig no min y 
tern per a ture 
nav i ga ble 
op er a tive 
vir u lent ly 
nee ro man cer 
an ti qna ry 



fash ion a ble 
pat ri mo ny 
vir tu al ly 
tol er a ble 
as: 1*1 cnl ture 
pen sion a ry 
whim si cal ly 
tab er na cle 
ac ri mo ny 
pref er a ble 



the first syllable, 

lap i da ry 
ven e ra ble 
pas sion ate ly 
ex pli ca tive 
crim i nal ly 
ar clii tec ture 
sta tion a ry 
su per a ble 
nom i na tive 



die tion a ry 
vul ner a ble 
% u ra tive 
mar riage a ble 
par si mo ny 
el i gi ble 
punc tu al ly 
du bi ous ly 
pal li a tive 
au di to ry 



u 



►SPELLER AND KEADER. 



The accent on the second syllable. 

me trop o lis 
con cu pis cence 



Dox ol o gy 
re spon si ble 
the ol o gy 
a poc a lypse 
pre die a ment 
fa cil i ty 
con tig u ous 
a men a ble 
sa lu bri ous 

a poc ry plia 
in tu i tive 
ter ra que ous 
am phib i ous 
ca lum ni ate 
plile bot o my 
hy poth e sis 
ma liog a ny 
al le vi ate 
con tern pla tive 



an ni bi late 
vo cif e rous 
sten og ra pby 
cor rob o rate 
a non y mous 
sa tir i cal 
to pog ra pby 

as trol o gy 
dis cer ni bly 
ar tic u late 
ma li cious ly 
com pas sioji ate 
au da cious ly 
cos mog ra pby 
e con o my 
CO ag u late 
or tbpg ra pliy 



SPELLEE A^^D READEE. lb 

AN EASY WAY TO SETTLE A QUARREL. 
Frank, his Father, and John. 

Frank. Father, John White has broken 
my Idte. I think he is the meanest boy I 
ever saw. 

Father, I ain sorry, my son, to hear you 
speak so about such a little matter ; you 
know, Frank, that John has no one to tell 
him any better, and you ought to feel sorry 
for him. Did he do it on purpose ? 

Frank. Yes, sir. I was flying it, but the 
wind was too strong for the line, which 
broke, and it fell among a number of boys, 
among which was John, who took it and 
broke it, and then sent back word of what 
he had done, and that if I would come 
over, he would serve me the same. 

Father. If all that you say is true, it is 
no reason why you should speak of him as 
you did. 

Frank. I was angry, then, father. I 
spoke before I thought. 



T6 SPELLER AND READER. 

Father, Be careful hencefortli, and al- 
ways stop to think before speaking in tliat 
manner. If, Frank, you will do as I tell 
you to, I tkink you can settle the affair very 
easily. 

Frank, I will most gladly, father. What 
is it ? 

Father. You remember that new kite 
which I made for you, which you have not 
yet used : you can carry it over to John as 
a present. He has no one to make kites 
for him. 

Frank. Shall I go now, father ? But 
how do I know he will take it kindly % . 

Father. You must not think of that, my 
son. 

Frank. I will go now ; may I not, father ? 

Father. Yes. I do not need you at pres- 
ent ; do not stop long, however. [Fxit Frank, 

[Johi goes on the stage, Frank returns 
with his kite. 

Franh. Good morning, John : here is a 
new kite, which I will give you. 



SPELLER AND READER. Y7 

John. Wliy do you give it to me ? I 
should not'tliink you would, for I broke 
yours last niglit. 

Frank, Tliat is tlie reason I gave it to 
you, to show you that I did not care for the 
kite, and that I was not offended with you. 

John. Frank, you make me ashamed of 
myself for doing as I did. Will you for- 
give me ? 

Frank. It is already forgiven, John. I 
must go home now, for I told father I would 
not stop. Will you not accept the kite % 

John. Thank you, Frank. I will accept 
it as a gift from you, and every time I fly 
it, it will make me think of the one who 
gave it to me. 

Frank, Good by, John. 



IS 



SPELLER AND EEADEK. 



The accent 

Ar o mat ic 
rep e ti tion 
al le gor ic 
e van gel ic 
ef fer ves cence 
ig no ra mus 
su do rif ic 
cir cum ja cent 
sac ri le gious 

vir tu o so 
cir cum stan tial 
an i mal cule 
met a pliys ics 
nom en cla ture 
ad ven ti tious 
sper ma ce ti 
der e lie tion 
al ge bra ic 
in ca pa cioiis 



on the third syllable^ 

man i fes to 
ap pa ra tus 
ex hi bi tion 
con tu ma cious 
sal a man der 
pes ti len tial 
in u en do 
con va les cenee 
ac a dem ic 



ad a man tine 
syc phan tic 
in flu en tial 
rbet o ri cian 
tlie ret ic 
met a mor plius 
be a tif ic 
ac qui es cence 
e van es cent 
pro ter per feet 



Sl^ELLER AND READER. 19 



The accent on the second syllable. 

Ob lig a to ly la bo ri ous ly 

com mil ni ca ble in suf fer a ble 

gra til i tous ly im pen i tent ly 

in du bit a bly com mu ni ca tive 

de rog a to ry re mu ne ra tive 

ob se qui ous ly fan tas ti cal ly 

me lo di ous ly in cor ri gi ble 

in dis so lii ble mag nif i cent ly 

ex plan a. to ry in ter min a ble 

dis in ter est ed re pos i to ry 

in cend i a ry a bom i na bly 

pa tbet ic al ly ma te ri al ly 

for tu i tons ly fe lo ni ous ly 

e pis to la ry iu del i ca cy 

in vet er a cy im mod er ate ly 

v^o cab u la ry lie ro ic al ly 

her ed it a ry vo lup tu a ry 

pe cu ni a ry con fed er a cy 

gram mat ic al ly bar mo ni ous ly 



80 Speller and eeadee. 



THE LITTLE HUSBANDMAN. 

I'm a little husbandman ; 
Work and labor hard I can ; 
I'm as hapj)y all the day 
At my work, as if 'twere play : 
Though I've nothing fine to wear, 
Yet for that I do not care. 

When to work I go along, 
Singing loud my morning song, 
With my wallet at my back, 
Or my wagon whip to smack, 
O, I am as happy then 
As any idle gentlemen. 

I've a hearty appetite,^ 
And I soundly sleep at night, 
Down I lie, content to say, 
" I've been useful all the day." 
I'd rather be a ploughboy than 
A useless little gentleman. 



SPEIXEE AND READER. 81 



ABBREVIATIONS. 

A. or Ans. Answer. 

A. B. or B. A. Bachelor of Arts. 

Abp. Archbishop. 

A. M. or M. A. Master of Arts. 

A. M. In the year of the world, or before noon. 

A. D. Anno Domini, in the year of our Xiord. 

A. A. S. Fellow of the American Academy, 
Adml. Admiral. 

Admrs. Administrators. 
Acct. Account. 

B. D. Bachelor of Divinity. 
Bp. Bishop. 

Bart. Baronet. 

B. V. Blessed Virgin. 

C. Cent, Centum, an Hundred. 
Capt. Captain. 

Cr. Creditor. 

Col. Colonel. 

Co. Company. 

Com. Commissioner. 

Cwt. An hundred weight. 

C. P. S. Keeper of the Privy Seal. 

C. S. Keeper of the Seal. 

D. D. Doctor of Divinity, 
Dr. Doctor, or Debtor. 
Dd. Delivered. 

6 



82 SPELLEK ANDREADEK. 

Esq. Esquire. 

E. G. For example. 

E. L. S. Eellow of the Linnean Society. 

F. A. S. Fellow of the Antiquarian Society. 

F. R. S. Fellow of the Royal Society. 

G. R. George the King. 
Gent. Gentleman. 
Genmo. Generalissimo. 
Hon. Honourable. 

lb. or Ibid. The same place. 

i. d. The same. 

i. e. That is. 

J. H. S. Jesus the Saviour of men. 

C. S. A. Confederate States of America. 

L. D. Doctor of Law. 

Kt. Knight. 

Lieut. Lieutenant. 

L. S. Place of the Seal. 

LL.D. Doctor of Laws. 

M. D. Doctor of Physic. 

Mr. Mister. 

Mrs. Mistress. 

M. S. Sacred to the Memory. 

M. P. Member of Parliament. 

MS. Manuscript. 

MSS. Manuscripts. 

Math. Mathematics. 

Madm. Madam. 

N. P. Mark well or take notice. 



SPELLER AND READER. 83 

No. Number. 

N. S. New Style. 

0. S. Old Style. 

Per cent. By the hundred. 

P. M. G. Professor of Music, Gresham College. 

P. S. Postscript. 

P. M. Afternoon. 

Q. Queen, Question. 

q. d. As if he should say. 

q. 1. As much as you please. 

q. s. A sufficient quantity. 

Rev. Reverend. 

Rt. Hon. Right Honourable; 

St. Saint. 

5. T. P. Professor of Divinity. ' 
Servt. Servant. 

U. S. A. United States of America. 

Ult. The last. 

V. Vide, See, Note. 

Viz. for Videlicet, that is to say. 

Xt. Christ. ^ 

Xtn. Christian. 

6. And. • . 
&c., et cetera, and so forth. 



.J^Cie: 



84 SPELliER AND READEE. 

STOPS AND MARKS. 

A Comma is marked thus , 

A Semicolon ; 

A Colon : 
A Period, or full stop 

A Note of Interrogation ? 

A Note of Admiration - ! 

A Parenthesis () 

Crotchets or Brackets [] 
An Apostrophe 

An Asterisk * 

A Caret ^ 

A Dash — 
A Hyphen 

An Index ** j||^°» 

An Obelisk t 

A Paragraph T 

"^' A Quotation " 

A Section' § 



A Brace 



} 



The reader will pause or stop at the comma, till 
he can say one ; at the semicolon, one, two ; ut 
the colon, one, two, three ; at the period, note of 
intert'ogation, and admiration, one, two, three, four; 



SPELLER AND READER. 85 

FIGURES AND NUMBERS. 



One 


1 


I 


Two ^ 


2 


II 


Three 


3 


III 


Four 


4 


IV 


Five 


5 


V 


Six 


6 


VI 


Seven 


7 


VII 


Eight 


8 


VIII 


Nine 


9 


IX 


Ten 


10, 


X 


Eleven 


11 


XI 


Twelve 


12 


XII 


Thirteen 


13 


XIII 


Fourteen 


14 


XIV 


Fifteen 


16 


XV 


Sixteen 


16 


XVI 


Seventeen 


17 


XVII 


Eighteen 


18 


XVIII 


Nineteen 


19 


XIX 


Twenty 


20 


XX 


Twenty-five 


25 


XXV 


Thirty 


30 


XXX 



86 



SPELLER AND READER. 



Thirty-five 


35 


XXXV 


Forty 


40 ^ 


XL 


Forty-five 


45 


XLV 


Fifty 


50 


L 


Fifty-five 


$5 


LV 


Sixty 


60 


LX • 


Sixty-five 


65 


LXV 


Seventy 


70 


LXX 


Seventy-five 


75 


LXXV 


Eighty 


80 


LXXX 


Eighty-five 


85 


LXXXY 


Ninety 


90 


XC 


' Ninety- five 


95 


XCV 


Ninety-nine 


99 


XCIX 


One hundred 


100 


c 


Two hundred 


200 


GO 


Three hundred 


300 


ccc 


Four hundred 


400 


coco 


Five hundred 


500 


D 


Six hundred 


600 


DC 


Seven hundred 


700 


DCC 


Eight hundred 


800 


DCCG 


Nine hundred 


900 


DCCCC 


One thousand 


1000 


M 


One thousand eight hundred and ty^ 


'enty-six ; 1826, 


MDCCCXXVI. 





SPELLER AND READER. 87 



ISABEL. 

I wisli I were a butterfly, 

Said little IsaLel ; 
What pretty tales of summer flowers 

I to my friends would tell ! 

I'd never rest upon a rose, 

A tulip, or a pink ; 
But of their varied hues and tints 

I afterwards would think. 

I'd rove from nlorn to setting sun. 

And never stop to rest, 
Unless it were. on some sweet flower, 

That I might love the best. 

To rest upon a deep-red rose, 
Would give me great delight.; 

But then I'd love as well to rest 
Upon a rose that's white. 



88 SPELLER AI^TD EEADEE. 

The lilly and the primrose pale, 

The violet so blue, 
I'd stop and give to each a kiss, 

As onward still I flew. 

I think you told me once, mamma, 
That up where shines the star. 

There is a world of fadeless flowers, 
More sweet than these by far ; — • 

And children who are good and pure 
May rove amongst them free : 

O, if I were but there, mamma, 
How happy I should be ! 



Note. — Ii'^would appear silly for a person reall:^ to wish 
to be a butterfly. In this case, we are only to consider 
Isabel as indulging a momentary fancy, and not as express- 
ing a settled and mature desire. 



SPELLER AND EEADER. 89 

THE BOY THAT COULD NOT READ. 

Tliere was ouce a little boy wlio was tra- 
velling over a country wliere tliere were no 
houses. At length lie came to a place where 
the road divided into two paths, one lead- 
ing to Boston, the other to Salena. 

By the way-side there was a post set up, 
and on this jDOst was a board, and on this 
board were some letters^ to show travellers 
which road led to Boston, and which to 
Salem. 

The little boy wished to go to Boston, 
and was ^ery anxious to know which of the 
two roads led to that city ; but, alas ! he 
could not read. 

He looked up at the guide-board for a 
long time, and said to himself, as follows : 
" I wish I could read ; I could then tell 
which road to take. 

It is now almost dark; if I take the 



90 SPELLER AND READER. 

wrong road^ I stall not get to Boston to- 
night ; I liave no money, and I must stay 
on tlie road till I reach home." 

The little boy then looked again at the 
guide-board, and again he said, "Would 
that I could read. I could then tell which 
way to go." 

I beg my young readers will all recollect 
this little story, and let them all learn how 
to read. It will cost them some study; but 
a person who does not learn to read, often 
goes through the world, like the little boy 
on his journey, without knowing whether 
he is on the right road or the wrong one. 



MORE ABOUT THE BOY THAT COULD 
NOT READ. 

I suppose you would be glad to hear the 
rest of the story of the boy that could not 
read. I will now tell it to you. 

After waiting at the guide-post for a long 



SPELLER AND READER. 91 

time, lie chose tlie riglit-liand road, hoping 
that it might prove the true one. He then 
trotted along very fast, for it was now near 
sunset. 

In a short time, it was quite dark. The 
clouds were thick and heavy, and it soon 
began to rain. The boy pushed on, how- 
ever, hoping all the while that he should 
meet somebody that could tell him if he 
was on the right road or not. 

But it was a long time before auy one 
came along, and all this while the little 
traveller was wishing that he had learned 
to read. 

"My father," said he to himself, "has 
often desired me to go to school ; but I 
loved to play about the streets much bet- 
ter than to sit on a bench, and gaze into a 
book. 

" And now I am punished for my disobe- 
dience and my folly. A person who will 
not learn to read can do but little, and very 



92 SPELLER AND EEADEE. 

often in life lie must be in doubt whether 
lie takes the right road or the wrong one. 
If I can get home again, I will certainly 
learn to read." 

The boy now met a man on horseback, 
and asked him if he was on the road to 
Boston. " No," said the stranger, " this is 
the turnpike road to Salem. You must 
turn and go back thiee miles, to find the 
Boston road." 

The little boy now went back to the 
guide-board and then took the right hand 
road, which led him to Boston. But he 
did not get there till morning. This affair, 
however, taught him a good lesson. 

" I see now," said he, " that it is a great 
thing to know how to read. He who can 
read will get knowledge that will save him 
much time and trouble. Books are like 
guide-boards, and they show uathe way to 
go. 

" But we musit learn to read, or the books 



SPELLER AND READER. 93 

are as useless as the guide-board was to 
me." With these wise thoughts, the boy 
turned to his books, and soon became a 
good scholar. 

JACK FROST. 

Who hath killed the smiling flowers. 
Once so fair in yonder bowers ? 
Who hath ta'en away their bloom? 
Who hath swept them to the tomb ? 
Jack Frost — Jack Frost. 

Who hath chased the birds so gay, 
Lark and linnet, all away ? 
Who hath hushed their joyous breath ? 
And made the woodland still as death? 
Jack Frost — Jack Frost. 

Who hath chilled the romping river ? 
Who doth make the old oak shiver ? 
WTio hath wrapped the world in snow f 
Who doth make the wild winds blow ? 
Jack Frost — Jack Frost. 



94 SPELLER AND PwEADEE, 

Wlio (lotli ride on snowy drift, 
"When tlie night' winds, keen and swift, 
Sweep the land and sweep the sea, 
Bent on mischief — who is he ? 

Jack Frost — Jack Frost. 

Who doth strike with icy dart, 
The way-worn traveller to the heart ? 
Who doth make the ocean wave 
The seaman's home, the seaman's grave ? 
Jack Frost— Jack Frost. 

Who doth prowl, at midnight hour. 
Like a thief around the door, 
Through each crack and crevice creeping, 
Through the very key-hole peeping ? 
Jack Frost — Jack Frost. 

Who doth pinch the traveller's toes ? 
Who doth sting the schoolboy's nose ? 
Who doth make your fingers tingle ?. 
Who doth make the sleigh-bells jinglej . .' 
Jack Frost — Jack Frost.